Senior Balance Exercises For Poor Vision

By Suzanne Stoke, Physical Therapist @ Exercise For Balance via www.exerciseforbalance.com

   Older adults who notice changes in their vision are encouraged to practice senior balance exercises to make sure they have good balance and don’t experience a fall. Please see more information at     http://www.exerciseforbalance.com/buy-now  Vision is a top priority for helping the brain and body to stay balanced with all movement activities. Many aging individuals experience common age-related visual changes as they grow older.
Some of the most common aging changes affecting the eyes and balance include:
•    An inability of the eyes to adjust to varying levels of light and darkness. As a result, individuals need more time to adjust to lighting changes.
•    A loss of dark adaptation. This compromises a person’s vision, particularly under conditions of low lighting (when walking about or toileting at night). When moving from a dimly lit room into bright lighting and vice versa, individuals may experience temporary blindness until the eyes adjust to the dramatic change in lighting.
•    A greater sensitivity to glare. Common sources of glare include sunlight shining through windows reflecting off glossy, waxed floors, bright light from unshielded light fixtures directed towards the eye, and looking directly into the sun. Glare is troublesome because it hides potential fall hazards.
•    Cataract (a gradual clouding of the lens) is the most common visual problem in the older population. It affects mobility and balance as it reduces the perception of the edges of steps and sidewalks, as well as altering depth perception of the ground. Individuals with cataracts often complain of poor visual acuity, difficulty seeing in dim light, and increased sensitivity to glare.
Preventive Strategies
There are several steps individuals low vision and balance problems can take:
Visit the Eye Doctor (Ophthalmologist)

•    The best way to protect your sight to get regular eye exams; they can detect disease early. If you have a visual disease, treatment can begin immediately, which may help to prevent unnecessary vision loss.
Modify the Lighting Environment

Poor lighting makes low vision doubly dangerous. The right lighting can make all the difference in maintaining balance:
•    Make sure that commonly used areas of the home (stairways, hallways, bedrooms, and bathrooms) have sufficient light.  Install bright lighting in all rooms to avoid tripping over objects that are not easy to see. In general, older eyes need more light to see.
•    Try smart lights. Whether they are triggered by motion or come on at pre-specified times, smart lights turn on lights without having to use light switches.
•    Avoid abrupt lighting changes; use of dimmer switches varies the amount of light available and prevents sudden shifts in light. LED lights provide excellent illumination without overtaxing the wiring circuits and are easily dimmable.
•    Avoid lighting glare; reposition lamps or use lampshades to control glare. Floor glare can be eliminated with carpets and nonslip floor finishes that diffuse rather than reflect glare.
•    Use nightlights to make navigation in the dark easier and safer. Nightlights in the bedroom and walkway to the bathroom are important, especially for those elders who get up frequently at night to toilet.
•    Exterior walkways and entrances should be well lighted. Consider installing motion-sensor flood lights or increase lighting on exterior pathways, porches and doorways.
Other sensible tips to support one’s balance include:
•    Don’t wear multifocal lenses while walking, particularly on stairs. This can lead to blurred vision and falling. Using single lens distance glasses instead.
•    Wear glasses if you need them and clean eye glasses often to improve visibility.
In addition, if you have low vision, be sure to also practice senior balance exercises to help maximize your stability skills and prevent a fall.

Senior Balance Exercises For Poor Vision

  Older adults who suffer with poor vision are encouraged to rehearse  senior balance exercises to help improve stability. One equilibrium routine you can practice is to stand with your feet shoulder width a part and center your body weight over the middle of your feet. In this position, concentrate on the sensory input from your feet, which will maximize your steadiness. You can master this steadiness technique and other senior balance exercises by joining in with the demonstration by a knowledgeable Physical Therapist in the Exercise For Balance DVD.

Senior Balance Exercises In The Exercise For Balance DVD

Learn balance exercises with the Exercise For Balance DVD

Learn balance exercises with the Exercise For Balance DVD

    To overcome visual problems that lead to imbalance,  get started on a course of the best balance exercises with the Exercise For Balance DVD. The healthcare provider recommended Exercise For Balance DVD is a high quality instructional DVD to use at home or in a group setting. The easy to understand and simple to follow Exercise For Balance DVD includes  a step by step series of the latest balance and strength exercises necessary to optimize senior fitness and to carry out basic daily activities like shopping, doing laundry,  walking, standing, cleaning house, stair climbing or to advance to more difficult pursuits like skiing, dancing, playing golf and hiking. In the  comprehensive Exercise For Balance DVD, you will learn how to improve stability, how to apply steadiness techniques and how to safely execute balance routines from a  qualified balance specialist — licensed Physical Therapist—who has worked with balance and dizziness disorders for over 25 years. Get your copy of the Exercise For Balance DVD by clicking on the BUY NOW button

Don’t wait. Start balance exercises today with the Exercise For Balance DVD to improve balance and prevent falls.

For more information see http://www.mayoclinic.com/health-information/